POISON PRESCRIPTION: Warfarin rat poison widely used as prescription blood thinner  

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POISON PRESCRIPTION: Warfarin rat poison widely used as prescription blood thinner

(NaturalNews) Many drugs pushed out by Big Pharma are equivalent to rat poison, but only a handful can actually claim to be rat poison. Meet warfarin: a widely used blood thinner which, prior to being used to treat a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, was used as rat poison.
Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heartbeat that affects 2.2 million Americans. It occurs when the upper chambers of the heart do not dance to the beat of the lower chambers. This irregular and sometimes rapid heartbeat can cause poor blood flow, thereby increasing the risk of stroke.
Warfarin is derived from a coumarin anticoagulant (blood-clotting) chemical present in sweet clover and other plants. In the early 1920s, veterinarians noted that cows were experiencing bleeding problems during certain times of the year. This was eventually linked to the sweet clover hay that the cows were consuming, earning the name “sweet clover disease.”

Getting to the heart of the problem

The compound responsible for bleeding – dicumerol – was discovered in 1934. In the early 1940s, it started to be tested in people as a blood thinner. In 1945, a stronger version of dicumerol was patented and named after the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF).
Around that same time, a close cousin of warfarin, named coumafuryl, was marketed as a rat poison under the brand names Rat-A-Way and Lurat. Coumafuryl was considered an effective rat poison for its odorless and tasteless quality, making it easier to feed to rats.
Warfarin was originally too strong to be given to people. However, it was prescribed for medical use in 1954, and increased in popularity in the early 1990s for slashing the risk of annual strokes by two-thirds, from 4.2 percent to 1.4 percent.

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